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24. January 2011

Release of Bugzilla 3.2.10, 3.4.10, 3.6.4, and 4.0rc2

by Bugzilla Team

Some serious security issues were discovered in Bugzilla, and as a result we have four security releases for you today. We recommend that all Bugzilla administrators read the Security Advisory that was published along with these releases, and that you update as soon as possible.

Bugzilla 4.0rc2 is our second Release Candidate for Bugzilla 4.0. This release has received QA testing, and should be considerably more stable than the development releases before it. It is still not considered fully stable, and so you should understand that if you use it, you use it at your own risk.

If feedback from this release candidate indicates that it is mostly stable, then Bugzilla 4.0 will be released in a few weeks. If feedback indicates that more extensive fixes are needed, there may be another release candidate after this one.

Bugzilla 3.6.4 is our latest stable release. It contains various useful bug fixes in addition to the security patches. This is likely to be the last bug-fix release in the 3.6 series. Once Bugzilla 4.0 is released, the 3.6 series will only get security fixes.

Bugzilla 3.4.10 is a security update for the 3.4 branch:

Bugzilla 3.2.10 is a security update for the 3.2 branch. Please remember that with the release of Bugzilla 4.0, the Bugzilla 3.2 series will reach End Of Life. That means that this is very likely to be the last security release ever for the 3.2 series.

20. December 2010

Deprecation of Windows 2000 Support for All Supported Branches of Bugzilla

by Max Kanat-Alexander (mkanat)

In the upcoming weeks, the Bugzilla Project will be releasing new versions of Bugzilla on all branches–3.2.10, 3.4.10, 3.6.4, and 4.0rc2. Due to some important changes that are coming in those releases, you will no longer be able to install Bugzilla on Windows 2000 or Windows 2000 Server. You will, however, still be able to use a web browser on Windows 2000 or Windows 2000 Server as a client to access Bugzilla.

Note that Windows 2000 itself reached end-of-life from Microsoft in July of this year, so this is in line with that, as well.

All newer versions of Windows will still be supported. Only Windows 2000 and Windows 2000 Server support is being deprecated.

02. November 2010

Release of Bugzilla 3.2.9, 3.4.9, 3.6.3, and 4.0rc1

by Bugzilla Team

Today is the release of our first Release Candidate for 4.0, in addition to the bug-fix release for our stable branch, 3.6.3, and two security-only releases for older branches, 3.4.9 and 3.2.9. All of today’s releases contain important security fixes, and we recommend that all Bugzilla administrators read the Security Advisory that was published along with these releases.

Bugzilla 4.0rc1 is our first Release Candidate for Bugzilla 4.0. This release has received QA testing, and should be considerably more stable than the development releases before it. It is still not considered fully stable, and so you should understand that if you use it, you use it at your own risk. In particular, certain aspects of the WebServices have not yet been tested as part of this Release Candidate, so they may change before the final release.

If feedback from this release candidate indicates that it is mostly stable, then Bugzilla 4.0 will be released in a few weeks. If feedback indicates that more extensive fixes are needed, there may be another release candidate after this one.

Bugzilla 3.6.3 is our latest stable release. It contains various useful bug fixes and security improvements:

Bugzilla 3.4.9 is a security update for the 3.4 branch:

Bugzilla 3.2.9 is a security update for the 3.2 branch:

Note that once we release the final Bugzilla 4.0, the 3.2.x series will reach End Of Life. This means that no new updates will be released for 3.2.x, even if there are serious security issues found in that series. All installations running 3.2.x are strongly encouraged to update to 3.6.x or 4.0rc1.

23. October 2010

Bugzilla 4.0 Release Notes Ready

by Max Kanat-Alexander (mkanat)

Just a quick update to let everybody know that we now have Draft Release Notes for Bugzilla 4.0, including a list of New Features in 4.0.

We’re expecting to have Release Candidate 1 out soon, for 4.0–possibly this coming week.

23. September 2010

Make Bugzilla Pretty: A Contest

by Max Kanat-Alexander (mkanat)

Hello out there, developers and designers! After many years of working on Bugzilla’s usability, we have finally come to the point where we think that it’s time…we want to make Bugzilla look nice. Gone are the days when it is OK for open-source software to be functional but unattractive–Bugzilla needs a UI that not only works well, but also looks great!

To this end, we are having a contest for designers, to see who can come up with the best new design for Bugzilla. It’s called Make Bugzilla Pretty!

You don’t have to know anything about HTML or Bugzilla to enter (though it helps), you just have to be able to redesign and submit an image to us.

With your entry, you could be giving the world a great-looking open-source bug-tracking system, impacting the lives of millions of developers, forwarding the cause of open-source in the new decade, and getting some sweet promotion for yourself in the process!

We look forward to seeing what you come up with!

17. August 2010

The First Bugzilla Users & Administrators Group: August 4, 2010

by Max Kanat-Alexander (mkanat)

On Wednesday, August 4, we had the first Bugzilla Users & Administrators Group meeting, at the Wikimedia Foundation in San Francisco. In attendance were representatives from the Wikimedia Foundation, NASA, Yahoo!, the NTP Project, and the Bugzilla Project.

The event was catered with full meals and drinks (both beer and sodas) for anybody who wanted to take advantage of them.

Max Kanat-Alexander, one of the lead Bugzilla developers, went over some of the new features that are coming in Bugzilla 4.0, which spawned some discussion about WebServices between the attendees, and how best to use the new and existing features to implement various workflows.

This flowed nicely into a discussion of project management, and how best to implement project management around Bugzilla. The needs of the attendees around project management were all quite different, but we all generally agreed that the most important part of Project Management is ability to get an overview of the current status of a project at a glance. The Wikimedia Foundation had a a list of requirements for project management that more-or-less covered the advanced features that most organizations would expect from project management.

Yahoo! pointed out that many people have pre-existing project management systems that they are already comfortable with, so the most important thing is for Bugzilla to expose all of the interfaces that project management systems would need in order to interface with Bugzilla.

Once we had these requirements sorted out, the question was–how do we want to implement them?

Well, some things need to be implemented in Bugzilla itself, such as the ability for project management meetings to do simple mass-triage on a lot of bugs at once, using a single user interface. (For example, the ability to edit each field individually on each bug a list of bugs.)

However, most project management features belong in a separate product, perhaps an extension to Bugzilla, or maybe just a Mediawiki extension that allows for generating nice reports from Bugzilla. Most likely, we’ll end up with a combination of both–a Bugzilla Extension to add project management features to Bugzilla, and a Mediawiki extension to add more reporting and extended project management functionality.

It was universally agreed that the most important thing for us to do is to improve Bugzilla’s WebService interface until it can provide everything that an external Project Management tool would need, because even if we develop our own tool, there are still going to be a lot of people who want to use the tool that they’re already most familiar with, and offering integration points into Bugzilla will let people do that.

Our next meeting will be on Wednesday, December 8, 2010 at Yahoo! Inc. [alternate link: Facebook Event]. The focus of the meeting is going to be User Interface. We look forward to seeing you there!

05. August 2010

Release of Bugzilla 3.2.8, 3.4.8, 3.6.2, and 3.7.3

by Bugzilla Team

There are four new releases today. All of today’s releases contain security fixes. We recommend that all Bugzilla administrators read the Security Advisory that was published along with these releases.

Bugzilla 3.6.2 is our latest stable release. It contains various useful bug fixes and security improvements:

Bugzilla 3.4.8 is a security update for the 3.4 branch:

Bugzilla 3.2.8 is a security update for the 3.2 branch:

Bugzilla 3.7.3 is our third unstable development release leading to Bugzilla 4.0. We have done a fair amount of QA on this release. However, QA found many bugs that have not yet been fixed, so this release should not be used in production environments. Development releases exist as previews of the features that a future release of Bugzilla will contain. They also exist for testing purposes, to collect bug reports and feedback. So, if you find a bug in this development release (or you don’t like how some feature works) please tell us.

13. July 2010

Bugzilla 4.0: Bug Updating and Adding Attachments Via WebServices

by Max Kanat-Alexander (mkanat)

There have been two really big WebService enhancements checked in to the Bugzilla 4.0 tree in the last few days:

  • Bug.update, which allows you to update all of a bug’s fields via the WebService.
  • Bug.add_attachment, which lets you add an attachment to a bug via the WebService.

These will be available in most Bugzilla installations once they upgrade to 4.0. There are a lot of great possibilities for these, including version-control integration, the ability to automatically attach screenshots to a Bugzilla bug, etc. I wanted to let everybody know about them in advance so that you can start building tools that will integrate well with Bugzilla 4.0!

06. July 2010

Bugzilla 4.0 Has a New Default Status Workflow

by Max Kanat-Alexander (mkanat)

So, as of just a few minutes ago, the trunk Bugzilla code has a new default status workflow that looks like this:

  1. UNCONFIRMED
  2. CONFIRMED
  3. IN_PROGRESS
  4. RESOLVED
  5. VERIFIED

If you upgrade your installation to 4.0 (when it comes out), you will, by default, keep the old workflow, whatever it was. This is okay, except that there are now certain parts of Bugzilla (like, various pieces of text and so on) that assume you are using the new workflow, and we think the new workflow is much nicer, simpler, and clearer. So we’ve also included a script that will convert the old default workflow into the new default workflow, called contrib/convert-workflow.pl. We recommend that everybody convert to the new workflow, if you can.

If you want to see the new workflow in action, check out the bugzilla-tip demo installation.

Why Is There No NEW Status?

You might be asking yourself–why is there no “NEW” status in this new workflow? Well, we think that the status workflow should tell you something about the bug that the other fields don’t tell you about the bug. In particular, you can tell if a bug is new by looking at when the bug was filed, how many comments there are, who the assignee is, etc. In fact, in the past, a bug that had the “NEW” status may not have in fact actually been NEW–it was just not being worked on.

We feel that CONFIRMED and UNCONFIRMED both actually describe something more helpful about the bug and are more accurate than NEW.

05. July 2010

Release of Bugzilla 3.7.2

by Bugzilla Team

Today we have a new development snapshot that fixes a serious security issue in the previous development snapshot.

Bugzilla 3.7.2 is the new development snapshot that fixes this issue. However, please do remember that this is an unstable development release. This release has not received QA testing from the Bugzilla Project, and should not be used in production environments. Development releases exist as previews of the features that the next major release of Bugzilla will contain. They also exist for testing purposes, to collect bug reports and feedback, so if you find a bug in this development release (or you don’t like how some feature works) please tell us.